Symptoms of a Bad Fuel Pump in a 2000 Buick LeSabre

by Lynn Rademacher

With all of the advancements that have been made to cars over the years to make them fuel efficient and smooth riding, the basic systems still hold the most importance. A 2000 Buick LeSabre with a bad fuel pump can be a frustrating experience and can leave a driver stranded. The symptoms of a fuel pump going bad are sometimes ignored in the beginning as a car quirk but the signs of a fuel pump going bad should not be ignored.

Overheating Pump

When a fuel pump overheats it is actually the motor of the fuel pump that is having the issues. The fuel pump motor controls the amount of fuel that is provided to the engine. In Buick LeSabres an overheated fuel pump will present similar to one that has mechanical failure. The pump will stop functioning and the engine will stop running. However, LeSabres that are suffering from an overheated pump can usually be restarted once the motor has had a chance to cool down.

Mechanical Failure

If mechanical failure of the Buick LeSabre fuel pump occurs then the mechanical components of the fuel pump cease to function. The symptoms of this problem show up when the engine of the car will suddenly turn off. The electrical components will all continue to work however. The engine stops running because the pump has stopped supplying fuel to the injectors and the engine doesn't have enough fuel to create the necessary combustion to move the car. If this occurs while driving it is important to get to the side of the road as quickly as possible because the car may not be able to start again.

Intermittent Failure

This symptom is often overlooked by drivers. It shows up as the engine of the Buick LeSabre having difficulty maintaining power. Most often this symptom will show up while the car is idling as the least amount of fuel is being pumped into the fuel injectors by the fuel pump. Also the pump receives the lowest amount of energy from the battery while at an idle. This can result in a failing pump to intermittently shut off which will result in a temporary drop in fuel to the injectors. Since the injectors are unable to provide enough fuel to the engine for combustion the engine starts to sputter.

References

About the Author

Lynn Rademacher started writing in 2001, covering technology, family and finance topics. Her writing has appeared in "Unique Magazine" and the "Ortonville Independent," among other publications. Rademacher holds a Bachelor of Arts in mass communication from South Dakota State University.

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