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How to Replace the Transmission Speed Sensor

by Johnathan Cronk

The speed sensor on a vehicle is the component that monitors the speed of the transmission gears. The sensor relays the information to tell the driver how fast the vehicle is moving. If you notice your speedometer stops working, or is faulty, the speed sensor has most likely failed. The transmission speed sensor is a magnetic coil component that plugs into the transmission. It's important to replace the sensor immediately to ensure you are aware at all times of your traveling speed.

Park the vehicle and turn the engine off. Allow the vehicle to cool for a half hour. Jack the front of the vehicle up until there is enough room for you to climb underneath.

Crawl under the vehicle; lie on your back and look up. Locate the speed sensor. The sensor is found on the bottom of the transmission and can be identified as a small plug that is sticking straight out of the transmission with an electrical connector plugged into it.

Squeeze the release tab on the electrical connector. Continue to squeeze as you pull the connector out of the sensor.

Use a wrench to grasp and twist the sensor counterclockwise until the sensor is loose enough to remove. Remove the sensor from the transmission.

Align the replacement sensor in place. Twist the sensor clockwise until the sensor is secured and cannot twist any further. Plug the electrical connector into the appropriate plug on the sensor. The sensor is now replaced. Slide out from under the vehicle and slowly lower the vehicle jacks.

Items you will need

About the Author

Johnathan Cronk is a freelance writer and began writing at the age of 18. Throughout his career he has specialized in sports, how-to and advice articles. He has also written sales pitches in the corporate setting since 2001. He studied business at Hudson Valley Community College before transferring to the State University of New York, Albany.

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Photo Credits

  • Speedometer close-up image by Proydakov from Fotolia.com