How to Replace a Toyota Truck Fan Belt

by Christian Killian

If the belt is slipping or squealing on your Toyota truck, check to see if it is worn or glazed. A worn, glazed or damaged belt is more prone to failure leaving you sitting on the side of the road. The belt on the Toyota truck spins the alternator, providing electrical power to the ignition of the truck as well as charging the battery. The belt also spins the fan and water pump to keep the engine from overheating. This belt is inexpensive and can be purchased at any auto parts store as well as through the Toyota dealer.

1

Locate the alternator on the passengers side of the engine. There are several mounting bolts on the alternator that are used to tension the belt on the pulleys.

2

Locate and loosen the top mounting bolt on the alternator bracket with a socket and ratchet. Do not remove the bolt from the bracket.

3

Locate and loosen the lower bolt on the alternator with a socket and ratchet. Do not remove the bolt from the bracket.

4

Push the alternator in toward the engine block and allow the belt to become slack or loose on the pulleys. Remove the belt from the pulleys and slide if off over the fan. Lift it out of the engine compartment.

5

Slip the new belt in over the fan blades and place it on the crank shaft pulley at the bottom of the engine. Loop the belt over the alternator pulley and pull the alternator out away from the engine until the belt is tight.

6

Tighten the upper mounting bolt on the alternator with a socket and ratchet then tighten the lower mounting bolt. Check the tension on the belt by pushing on it with your fingers. It should deflect about 1/8 of an inch f it is properly tensioned.

Items you will need

About the Author

Christian Killian has been a freelance journalist/photojournalist since 2006. After many years of working in auto parts and service positions, Killian decided to move into journalism full-time. He has been published in "1st Responder News" as well as in other trade magazines and newspapers in the last few years.

Photo Credits

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