How to Replace a Grand AM PCM

by Leonardo R. Grabkowski

Installing a PCM (power-train control module) is not a difficult task and can be done by almost anyone. If you have been told your Pontiac Grand Am has a faulty PCM and want to replace it yourself, it's a simple process.

PCM Example

Purchase a replacement PCM for your Grand Am. Make sure the PCM is specifically for the year model of your vehicle for the same engine as yours (3.4 L, 2.2 L or 3.8 L)

Battery

Disconnect the vehicle's battery. It is not recommended to work with vehicle electronics while the battery is connected, even if the car is turned off.

Glove Box

Remove the glove box door. The PCM in a Grand Am is located behind the glove box. You do not need to remove the entire glove box, just the door. Remove the glove box by opening the door any emptying its contents. Squeeze together the outside part of the glove box that becomes visible while open. Squeezing it will release the clip from its fastener, and the glove box will slip right off.

Unhook the connection module that runs from the PCM to the vehicle. Depress the outer clips and pull to release the connection module (It is a six or eight pin white connector).

Use the socket wrench or screwdriver (depending on the vehicle year) to remove the PCM from its mounting. There should be six bolts or screws. Keep the bolts or screws in a safe location because you will need them to install the new PCM.

Place the new PCM in the exact position as the old one. Tighten the screws or bolts to secure it and then plug the connection module back to the vehicle.

Replace the glove box door and reconnect the vehicle's battery. Start the vehicle to make it is operating normally.

Tip

  • check Try to locate a used PCM from a salvage yard to save money. Make sure the PCM comes from the same year model of vehicle with the same engine. PCMs for use in other applications will not correctly work.

Warning

  • close Do not touch the connection module or the PCM before disconnecting the vehicles battery. This can result in electrical shock.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Leonardo R. Grabkowski has been writing professionally for more than four years. Grabkowski attended college in Oregon. He builds websites on the side and has a slight obsession with Drupal, Joomla and Wordpress.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera http://commons.wikimedia.org, http://www.flickr.com/photos/modenadude/