How to Replace Fuel Injectors

by Contributor

Replacing a dirty or plugged fuel injector in your car can fix a number of problems including rough idle, stuttering or slow throttle response. Replacing your car's fuel injectors yourself is possible if you are comfortable with basic engine work, and it will save you money and time.

Take a picture of the assembled engine or carefully make notes of how and where everything attaches. Remove the air intake system and any hoses, mounts, wires or other parts that are in the way of the car injector railing.

Locate the bolts that hold the injector retaining rail in place and remove them. Pull out the rail to gain access to the injectors. Not all cars have an injector retaining rail.

Put on your goggles and pull out the first injector. The pressure in the system will make a small amount of gasoline squirt out with considerable force. If your injectors require a special removal tool you can purchase these at a dealership or local auto parts store.

Look for the old seal and make sure pieces are not stuck in the seat. Use a pick or small screwdriver to get any remnants out.

Prepare the new fuel injector by removing any caps and lubricating the seal with a small amount of motor oil. Move the new injector to the car and place it next to the fuel line on a clean rag.

Attach the new fuel injector and pay careful attention to the manufacturer's recommended torque.

Connect any hoses, wires and other parts, taking time to clean off excess grease and dirt along the way. If you forgot where something connects look at your notes or the picture you took.

Warnings

  • close Always work in a well-ventilated area.
  • close Dispose of gas and oil soaked rags properly.

Items you will need

About the Author

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