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How to Replace the EGR Valve on a Mustang

by Cassandra Tribe

The EGR valve, or exhaust gas recirculation valve, in your Mustang is essential to its being able to pass emissions tests, maintain good fuel mileage and smooth idling speeds. The valve passes exhaust gas back into the engine to cool gasses, prevent a buildup of nitrogen gas and burn up any remaining fuel. During the life of your car, you will have to replace the EGR valve on a Mustang several times as they are prone to becoming dirty and blocked. Fortunately, not only is the valve inexpensive, it is easy to replace.

Park your Mustang on a level surface and open the hood. Standing in front of the car, locate the EGR valve. It will be just behind and above the drive belts at the front of the engine. There will be several vacuum hoses attached to the valve and the valve itself has a silver in color disc like "hat" on it and a "L" shaped body.

Disconnect the vacuum hoses from the EGR valve. The hoses may have squeeze type hose clamps on the ends holding them in place, pinch the two tabs of the clamp together to open it and slide the hose off. Some hoses may be held in place by the force of the vacuum only, grasp the hose near where it connects to the EGR valve and pull the hose off.

Disconnect the exhaust vacuum line, which is a metal hose that is connected to the bottom left of the EGR valve. Use a wrench to unscrew the lock nut.

Remove the two bolts holding the valve onto the engine block using a 10 mm socket and socket wrench. To install the new valve, reverse these steps.

Tip

  • Change your EGR valve about one month before you will have an emissions test done on your Mustang. This will help your car pass.

Warning

  • Don't work on a car that has been recently driven. Car engines heat up quickly and you can be seriously burned should you touch the engine block when trying to remove the EGR valve.

Items you will need

About the Author

Cassandra Tribe has worked in the construction field for over 17 years and has experience in a variety of mechanical, scientific, automotive and mathematical forms. She has been writing and editing for over 10 years. Her areas of interest include culture and society, automotive, computers, business, the Internet, science and structural engineering and implementation.

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