How to Remove a Ventshade

by Jody L. Campbell

There are a few different types of ventshades and vent visors that cover the exterior window frames on cars and allow the window to be open slightly without letting in precipitation. All but one have clear-cut removal procedures. Some simply snap into the window channel, and some are screwed into the door (older chrome shades from auto manufacturers). The type people seek removal instructions for are those held by double-sided taped, which are available in aftermarket shops. Keep in mind the tape used is designed to adhere more as time passes. Removing the visor undamaged or even damaged is only one challenge. The tape residue is quite another.

Make a slight incision in the foam tape at the tapered front end of the vent-shade using the plastic scraper. Get as close to the surface of the car door as you can without contacting the paint.

Open the door.

Take a three-foot section of fishing line or dental floss and insert the middle into the incision.

Move the line or floss up and down in a slicing motion to cut through the tape. You might need to replace the three-foot section a time or two if friction snaps the line or floss. Continue until the ventshade is removed.

Follow the directions on the chosen solvent and apply it to the residue left by the two-way tape. Allow the solvent to soak in (keep in mind that 3M tape remover will damage paint if used improperly). Apply only to 5 or 6 inches of area at a time.

Wipe away the residue with a dry, clean, non-abrasive rag. Repeat until the residue is completely removed.

Clean the door frame with isoprypol alcohol and a clean non-abrasive rag .

Repeat for all vent-shades if desired.

Tip

  • check Softening the tape on the ventshade with heat will make the procedure easier. Park in direct sunlight on a warm, sunny day or use a hair dryer. Removing ventshades on a cold day will be difficult. If you don't intend to save the ventshades, they can be peeled off using force, but they rarely come off in one piece, so you might need this procedure to remove the pieces left behind.

Items you will need

About the Author

Jody L. Campbell spent over 15 years as both a manager and an under-car specialist in the automotive repair industry. Prior to that, he managed two different restaurants for over 15 years. Campbell began his professional writing career in 2004 with the publication of his first book.