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How to Remove the Brake Rotor on a Chevrolet Cobalt

by Jule Pamplin

The Chevrolet Cobalt employs an anti-lock braking system that is designed to exceed governmental standards for vehicle safety. To meet those standards, the components of the braking system need to be in proper working form. Rotors that are scored can significantly reduce the effectiveness of the braking system as well as wear the brake pads at a much faster rate than usual. The surface of the rotor should be smooth to allow for unfettered contact with the brake pads during braking. Remove the rotors and have them resurfaced if they have been gouged by the wear indicators of the brake pads. Replace the rotors if they are warped.

1

Park the Chevy Cobalt on a flat surface and in an area away from traffic. Put the transmission in "Park" and engage the parking (or emergency) brake.

2

Loosen the lug nuts on the rear tire with a lug wrench or 17 mm socket and breaker bar.

3

Place the lifting jack under the frame of the vehicle and raise the Cobalt. Place jack stands under the frame to support the Chevy. Lower the Cobalt onto the jack stands, leaving the tires enough clearance from the ground to enable you to remove and return the wheels.

4

Remove the lug nuts on the rear wheels and pull the wheels from the Cobalt's wheel bolts.

5

Locate the caliper slide bolts on the inner side of the brake caliper. There are two bolts on each caliper. Place the 13 mm socket and ratchet on the bolts and loosen them. Remove the socket and ratchet and complete the caliper bolt removal by hand.

6

Pull the caliper away from the brake rotor and caliper bridge and set it on top of the steering arm or an idle jack stand.

7

Remove the two bolts on the back side of the caliper bridge with a 15 mm socket and ratchet. Pull the bridge away from the rotor and set it aside.

8

Spray the front and back of the rotor with chain lubricant. The rotor may be stuck to the wheel bolts by a combination of rust and leaked brake fluid. Allow the lubricant to sit on the rotor for three to five minutes before attempting to remove the disc.

9

Grab the rotor on either side with both hands and pull the rotor from the wheel bolts.

Tip

  • If you have difficulty removing the rotor even after you have applied lubricant, tap the center section of the disc with a hammer.

Items you will need

About the Author

Jule Pamplin has been a copywriter for more than seven years. As a financial sales consultant, Pamplin produced sales copy for two of the largest banks in the United States. He attended Carnegie-Mellon University, winning a meritorious scholarship for the Careers in Applied Science and Technology program, and later served in the 1st Tank Battalion of the U.S. Marine Corps.

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