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Problems With the Throttle Body on the Chevy 8.1 L V8

by Horacio Garcia

The Chevrolet 8.1-L V8 engine has reports of throttle body problems affecting the operation of the engine. The throttle body acts as carburetor in the 8.1-L V8, which controls the amount of air allowed into the engine body. The amount of air alters the amount of fuel allowed into the cylinders, affecting the amount of power the engine provides.

Carbon Buildup

The Chevy 8.1-L V8 engine has a problem with carbon building up in the throttle body. This carbon problem makes the throttle body valve stick in place. This allows too much air into the engine cylinders, causing the engine to misfire. Once more air is permitted into the engine, more fuel is allowed to enter the cylinder heads. More fuel gives the engine more power when this power is not required.

Electronic Throttle Control

The electronic throttle control in the Chevy 8.1-L V8 engine can lose the signal between the accelerator pedal and throttle body. The throttle control normally sends a signal from the gas pedal and into the throttle body, telling it how much power is required. Once this signal is interrupted, the throttle body does not work correctly. The electronic throttle control needs to be replaced once this problem occurs.

Vacuum Leak

A hose runs on both ends of the throttle body of a Chevy 8.1-L V8 engine. These hoses are sealed with connections that can leak, causing a vacuum leak. Once the hoses begin to leak, air is released into the engine compartment and not into the engine. This loss of air causes the 8.1-L V8 engine to miss or stall.

Spindle Body Breaks

The throttle body valve opens and closes on a Chevy 8.1L V8 engine and works on a spindle. When this spindle body is breaking, it prevents the throttle body valve from opening and allowing more air into the engine. Once air is prevented from entering the engine, less gasoline is allowed into the cylinders. Less fuel means the engine has less power than it requires at times.

About the Author

Horacio Garcia has been writing since 1979, beginning his career as the spokesperson for Trinity Broadcast Network. Within 10 years Garcia was being called upon to write speeches and scripts for several state and federal congressmen, local broadcast networks and publications such as "Readers Digest." He received his bachelor's degree in public relations from Argosy University.

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