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How to Replace the Side Bumper Trim on a SeaDoo

by Alexander Callos; Updated October 25, 2017

Items you will need

  • Flathead screwdriver

  • Drill bit

  • Drill

  • Soap

  • Rags

  • Tape measure

  • Rubber mallet

A Sea-Doo is a type of recreational watercraft. You can ride a Sea-Doo in oceans, lakes and rivers. They are gas-powered and can travel at high speeds. They are available in sizes to accommodate one, two or three people. Sea-Doos, like any type of watercraft have different paint designs along with rear and side bumpers. These bumpers can undergo a lot of damage over time and will eventually need to be replaced.

Locate the rivet caps at each corner of the side bumper. Pry off the rivet caps with a flathead screwdriver and set them aside. Remove the four rivets with a 3/16-inch drill bit.

Insert a small screwdriver under the corners of the bumper and carefully pry up each corner. Pull each corner by hand to begin removing it. Work the screwdriver underneath the bumper as much as possible and continue pulling up to safely remove the bumper.

Clean the area where the bumper was located to remove any dirt and debris that may remain. Scrub the area with soap and a rag. Dry it thoroughly with a clean rag.

Measure the original bumper and record the width and height measurements so the proper size bumper can be purchased. Line up the bumper just where the original was located.

Pre-drill 3/16 inch holes into each of the corners and insert new rivets in the holes. Apply the rivet caps on top of the rivets and lightly hammer the caps with a rubber mallet to secure them to the bumper and the Sea-Doo.

About the Author

Alexander Callos began writing in 2005 for "The Lantern" at The Ohio State University and has written for various websites, including Bleacher Report, Top Ten Real Estate Deals and Columbus Sports. He has published articles for CBS Sports, SI.com and other websites. He graduated in 2007 from The Ohio State University with a bachelor's degree in public affairs journalism.

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