How to Replace the Rear Brakes on a GMC Yukon

by Contributing Writer; Updated November 07, 2017

Items you will need

  • Tire iron

  • Floor jack

  • Jack stands

  • Wrench and socket set

  • Long shafted flat-headed screwdriver

  • C-clamp

  • Steel wool

  • Graphite lubricant

  • Paper towel

  • 2 sets of new brake pads

The GMC Yukon uses two types of brakes: disc brakes and drum brakes. The disc brakes are used for everyday stopping and often need to be replaced a few times over the life of the vehicle. These brakes are located on all four wheels of the Yukon. The drum brakes are located only on the rear wheels and are used for the parking brake. Since these brakes are seldom used, they often never need to be replaced.

Raise the Yukon

Park the Yukon on a level, flat, solid surface.

Use the tire iron to loose the lug nuts on both rear wheels.

Place the floor jack under the rear differential and lift the Yukon until the back tires are off the ground and the jack stands will fit under the frame just in front of the rear wheel wells.

Lower the vehicle onto the jack stands.

Remove the lug nuts and the rear tires.

Dissassembling the Brakes

Loosen or remove the caliper pins using the socket set. The caliper pins are located on the back of the brake assembly and are the set of bolts farthest away from the axle.

Remove the brake assembly bolts. The brake assembly bolts are the set of bolts closer to the axle.

Pry off the brakes using the screwdriver. Depending on the level of corrosion, the brakes may just fall off when the bolts are removed.

Separate the caliper and the brake pad holder.

Place the C-clamp over the piston and the back of the caliper housing and compress the piston into the housing until just a little bit is sticking out.

Reassembly

Clean the corrosion off the brake tracks on the brake pad holder using the steel wool.

Wipe a small amount of lubricant across the brake tracks. Use the paper towel to smear the lubricant out into a thin film.

Place the brake pads in the tracks with the pads facing inwards.

Put the brake pad holder over the rotor with one pad against each side of the rotor. Insert the bolts to hold it in place.

Remove the C-clamp and place the caliper over the brake pads. Insert the caliper pins to hold the caliper in place.

Tighten the caliper pins and the bolts.

Put the tire back in place and tighten the lug nuts.

Repeat the steps for replacing the pads on the other side of the Yukon, then lower it to the ground.

Retighten all of the lug nuts on the rear tires.

About the Author

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Photo Credits

  • photo_camera brake image by Jan Will from Fotolia.com