How to Replace a Fuel Filter in a Ford 5.4L

by Allen Moore; Updated November 07, 2017

Items you will need

  • Drain pan

  • Fuel line disconnect tool

  • New filter

The oil filter, air filter and fuel filter are all very important parts of any Ford 5.4L engine’s routine maintenance schedule. The fuel filter is responsible for removing sediment and other foreign material from the gasoline before it reaches the fuel injectors. If you leave the fuel filter on past the recommended 15000-mile replacement interval, you risk allowing those contaminants to damage your fuel injectors and engine. To optimize fuel mileage and engine performance, replace your fuel filter on time, every time.

Climb under the vehicle below the driver’s seat area with the drain pan, tool and new filter.

Follow the fuel line forward from the fuel tank to locate the fuel filter, which is in the fuel line approximately half way between the tank and engine. If you’ve never seen a fuel filter before, familiarize yourself with the look of the new one prior to climbing under so you can easily spot the old one.

Pull the fuel-line retaining clips (located in the ends of the fuel lines where they connect to the filter) outward from the line using the fuel-line disconnect tool. Work these clips gently, as they break easily and you can only replace them by purchasing an entire fuel line.

Pull both fuel lines off the filter by hand. Pull the old filter out of the retaining strap and put it in the catch pan.

Insert the new filter with the flow arrow pointing forward, and reinstall the fuel lines by hand. Gently push the clips back into place in the fuel-line ends and climb out from under the truck.

Climb into the driver’s seat and insert the key into the ignition. Turn the key to the run position and count to ten and then shut the key off. Turn it back to the run position once more, count to ten a second time and then start the truck.

Tip

  • You can buy a fuel line disconnect tool at most auto parts retailers for a nominal fee.

Tip

  • Never work on a fuel system while smoking or around open flames as the fuel vapors ignite easily causing serious injury or death.

References

About the Author

Allen Moore's career includes awards in poetry and creative fiction, published lyrics, fiction books and nonfiction articles as well as a master certification in automotive service from the Ford Motor Company. Moore is a contributing writer for RF365.com and various other websites, a ghostwriter for Rainbow Writing and has over a dozen works of fiction currently in print.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera Jupiterimages/Pixland/Getty Images