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How to Change the Front Brakes on a '92 Toyota Pickup

by Robert Kohnke; Updated November 07, 2017

Items you will need

  • Tire iron

  • Jack

  • Jack stands

  • Socket wrench

  • C-clamp

Disc brakes are not only the safest and strongest brakes available for the 1992 Toyota pickup, they are also the cheapest and easiest to replace for the at-home mechanic. This is one reason why do-it-yourself mechanics are so happy with the Toyota pickup: It came equipped with four-wheel disc brakes. When it does come time to change them, all four tires can be done in about 2 hours.

Loosen all the lug nuts one full rotation counterclockwise with the tire iron.

Place the floor jack underneath the vehicle frame behind the driver-side front tire. Raise that side of the front of the pickup until the front tire is 2 inches off the ground. Set the jack stand under the frame and lower the pickup onto the jack stand. Remove the loosened lug nuts and remove the tire. Repeat the process for the opposite side of the front of the pickup.

Loosen the bolt on the bottom of the brake caliper mounting bracket with the socket wrench. The mounting bracket is the bracket that is attached to the rotor behind the wheel.

Pull the brake pads out of the bracket while you lift the bracket bottom into the air. The pads will simply pull out.

Compress the brake caliper cylinder in the center of the bracket by pressing it in with your fingers or thumbs. If the caliper does not compress by hand, compress it with the C-clamp by setting the stationary end of the clamp against the rear of the bracket and the movable end against the cylinder, then tightening the clamp until the caliper cylinder is flush with the bracket.

Place the new brake pads in to the slots the old ones were in. They will fit easily now that the caliper is pressed in.

Bolt the caliper bracket back down to the rotor and set the tire on the rotor. Finger tighten all of the lug nuts and lower the vehicle. Tighten all of the lug nuts with the tire iron.

References

About the Author

Robert Kohnke has been an avid writer since 1995. Kohnke is well-versed in gardening and botany, electronic/computer repair and maintenance, and technical support. He graduated with an Associate of Arts in agricultural business from Cosumnes River College, where he is continuing his education in computer technology and computer information science.

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Photo Credits

  • disque de frein image by Christophe Fouquin from Fotolia.com