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How to Change the Brake Pads in a Mazda 6

by Mark Robinson; Updated November 07, 2017

Items you will need

  • Brake pads

  • Ratchet and socket set

  • Lug wrench

  • C-clamp

  • Floor jack

  • Jack stands

Changing your brake pads is an important aspect of maintaining your Mazda 6. These bi-metallic pads grasp the brake rotor, utilizing friction to help bring your Mazda 6 to a halt. If your brakes are not changed in a timely manner, it can result in poor braking performance and even possible damage to the rotor and braking hardware. Change your brake pads when they become less than 1/8-inch thick.

Removing Brake Pads

Loosen the lug nuts on the wheel with a lug wrench. Lift the vehicle with a floor jack, and support the vehicle with jack stands.

Finish removing the lug nuts, and slide the wheel off of the axle. Set the lug nuts aside for safe keeping.

Use a ratchet and socket to remove the two mounting bolts from the caliper. Slide the caliper off of the rotor, and suspend it with mechanic wire.

Remove the brake pads from the caliper. Detach the retaining clips from the old brake pads, and set them aside. Place one of the old brake pads over the caliper piston, and use a C-clamp to push it flush against the caliper.

Installing Brake Pads

Attach the retaining clips onto the new brake pads. Place the pads inside of the caliper.

Place the caliper assembly over the rotor. Reinsert, and tighten, the two mounting bolts with a ratchet and socket.

Slide the wheel onto the axle, and reattach the lug nuts by hand. Remove the jack stands, and lower the vehicle to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts with a lug wrench.

Tips

Changing your brake pads also gives you an opportunity to inspect and, if necessary, change the brake rotor. Inspect the rotor for deep grooves and discoloration.

Warnings

Exercise caution when working underneath an elevated vehicle. Make sure the vehicle is properly supported by the jack stands at the correct points.

About the Author

Mark Robinson is a freelance graphic designer and writer. Since 2008 he has contributed to various online publications, specializing in topics concerning automotive repair, graphic design and computer technology. Robinson holds a Bachelor of Science in graphic design from Alabama A&M University.

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