How to Get High MPG With a Dodge 360

by Jen Davis

The Dodge 360-cubic-inch V-8 engine is commonly found in some of Dodge's largest and most powerful vehicles, including the older Ram trucks, vans and classic sport cars such as the Charger. The 360 is known more for power than fuel economy, but there are aftermarket upgrades and driving changes that can improve the general fuel economy of virtually any size engine. Though the 360 will never be known for getting great fuel mileage, it is always important to try to get the highest fuel mileage possible out of your vehicle. Vehicles with a Dodge 5.9-liter 360 are estimated to get between 10 and 13 miles per gallon, according to FuelEconomy.gov, one of the Environmental Protection Agency's websites.

Maintain your Dodge vehicle properly, making sure it gets regular oil changes and the engine stays in good condition. A properly functioning engine does not have to work as hard as an engine with problems. The more an engine has to work, the more fuel it will consume.

Install low-rolling resistance tires, which are estimated to increase fuel economy by reducing the amount of friction and resistance generated between tires and the road. Tires should also be kept correctly inflated and rotated.

Drive your car or truck with fuel conservation in mind. Do not leave your vehicle idling for long periods of time, run your air conditioner unnecessarily or drive at excessive speeds for long periods of time. Also try to avoid frequent accelerations, as these will cause your engine to consume more fuel than maintaining a steady speed. All of these activities cause your motor to work unnecessarily and lower your overall fuel economy. A large V-8 engine such as the 360 can consume a significant amount of fuel even while at an idle.

Plan your trips so that you avoid sitting in traffic for long periods of time, driving out of your way or making multiple trips. The EPA recommends making changes to the way you drive your vehicle to increase the length of time each tank of gasoline will last you.

About the Author

Jen Davis has been writing since 2004. She has served as a newspaper reporter and her freelance articles have appeared in magazines such as "Horses Incorporated," "The Paisley Pony" and "Alabama Living." Davis earned her Bachelor of Arts in communication with a concentration in journalism from Berry College in Rome, Ga.