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What Does the Flashing Key Sign on the Dashboard of My Nissan Serena Mean?

by Derek Wray

The flashing key -- or sometimes a car outline with a key inside of it -- is the security indicator light. This light flashes when the ignition switch is placed in the OFF, LOCK or ACC position. The blinking security indicator light indicates that the security system(s) equipped on the vehicle are operational.

The Nissan Anti-Theft System and the Nissan Vehicle Immobilizer System us this flashing key image to relay information to the driver about either the doors being unlocked or about the key itself. Fixing a concern with this light occasionally requires maintenance at a repair shop. The key sign on a Nissan Serena can be:

  • red
  • green¬†
  • solid or flashing.¬†

The dashboard light flashes a red key sign when the car is off and the doors are unlocked, while a solid red key illuminates if the car is off with the doors locked. A flashing green key sign appears if the battery in the key needs to be replaced. After replacing the battery, a simple relearn procedure must be performed. The illuminated red key sign with the ignition off informs the driver and passengers if the doors are locked. This light draws minimal current and will not drain the battery. The light is simply a normal communication function on the Nissan Serena.

Tips

If the Nissan Vehicle Immobilizer System is malfunctioning, the light will remain on while the ignition switch is placed in the ON position. If the light remains on and/or the engine will not start, see a Nissan dealer for service as soon as possible. You should bring all registered keys that you have when visiting the Nissan dealer for service.

About the Author

Derek Wray is an ASE Master-certified automotive instructor and former professional technician. Wray graduated from Universal Technical Institute with a degree in automotive and diesel technology. He has received technical training from General Motors Corporation and is the author of an engine performance reference book for automotive students.

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