Thinking about purchasing a new car? Use our new Car Loan Calculator to estimate your monthly car payment!

How to Check Transmission Fluid on a 1999 Oldsmobile Alero

by Grace Mclain

Transmission fluid plays a vital part in keeping the moving parts lubricated and cool inside the transmission. The transmission fluid draining and filling process for the 1999 Oldsmobile Alero requires a different process than just a basic "transmission drain and fill." You can change the transmission fluid in the 1999 Oldsmobile Alero in about a half-hour or so.

1

Park the car on a level surface and pop the hood.

2

Jack the front of the car up and place jack stands under the jack supports behind each front tire. There is a groove behind each front tire on the frame of the car that is designed to hold the weight of the car while the car is being jacked up Then lower the jack so that the front axle is resting securely on the jack stands.

3

Crawl under the car and locate the fluid check plug on the driver side of the transmission. The check plug is where you check the transmission fluid level.

4

Remove the check plug with a ratchet and a socket.

5

Set the emergency brake and crank the engine. Put the transmission in neutral.

6

Stick your finger inside of the transmission fluid check hole. The fluid should be to the top of the check hole while the engine is running in neutral. If the fluid is not near the top, then the transmission fluid is low.

7

Put the check plug back in and tighten it back down.

Tip

  • The 1999 Oldsmobile Alero does not have a dipstick. You can add automatic transmission fluid to the Alero by locating the transmission filler cap on the right side of the engine. The filler cap is located between the power steering pump and the air filter housing. The cap should say "ATF" on the cap. Unscrew the cap and add transmission fluid until it comes out of the check hole on the transmission.

Warning

  • The transmission fluid must be checked with the engine running and the transmission in neutral or you will get a false reading. A false reading can lead to transmission failure.

Items you will need

About the Author

Grace Mclain has been writing professionally since 1998. Her articles have appeared on eHow.com, Answerbag.com and LIVESTRONG.COM, and she specializes in automotive and business topics. McIain has a professional writing certificate from JB Hunt in Little Rock, Ark.

More Articles

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images