How to Change a Ford Windstar's Spark Plug Wires

by William Pullman

The Ford Windstar minivan, manufactured from 1994 to 2003, went through many mechanical and cosmetic changes through the years, although each model came with a 6-cylinder engine. The spark plugs in the engine receive an electric charge from the ignition coil and use that charge to ignite the fuel. Spark plug wires carry the electric charge. Change the spark plug wires when they are worn down from normal use.

1

Disconnect the negative cable from the battery by loosening the clamp bolt with an 8- or 10-mm wrench, then lift it off the terminal.

2

Locate the spark plug wires, which connect the plugs to the engine's ignition coil. All Ford Windstar models have six spark plug wires.

3

Remove one of the wires from a spark plug by gripping the boot and pulling out. You may need to rock the boot back and forth or twist the boot to the left and right while pulling.

4

Pull off the opposite end of the wire from the ignition coil by squeezing the tabs on the boot and lifting up.

5

Find the replacement spark plug wire that is the same length as the one removed from the engine. Discard the old wire when you locate the replacement.

6

Coat the inside of the spark plug wire boots with a small amount of dielectric grease to prevent corrosion.

7

Attach the replacement wire to the open terminal on the ignition coil. Use the end of the wire that has the locking tabs. To attach the wire, sit it on the open terminal, squeeze the tabs and press down. You will feel the wire snap in place.

8

Route the wire through the engine compartment to the open spark plug and attach the boot by pressing it down onto the spark plug until you feel it snap into place.

9

Repeat steps 3 to 8 with the five remaining wires.

10

Reattach the negative battery cable.

Tip

  • check Spark plug wires come in varying lengths, so be sure the new wires match the same length as the old ones you're replacing.

Warning

  • close Allow the engine to cool off before replacing the wires to prevent injury.

Items you will need

About the Author

William Pullman is a freelance writer from New Jersey. He has written for a variety of online and offline media publications, including "The Daily Journal," "Ocular Surgery News," "Endocrine Today," radio, blogs and other various Internet platforms. Pullman holds a Master of Arts degree in Writing from Rowan University.

Photo Credits

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