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How to Change the Starter in a 2005 Impala

by John Rose

Chevrolet first introduced the Impala in the 1958 model year and the nameplate continued through 1985. Chevrolet then brought the model back in 1994, only to discontinue it once again in 1996. The 2000 model year saw its comeback yet again and it has been in production ever since. As happens on other automobiles, the parts will wear out and you eventually will need to change them -- including the starter. You can save money by doing it yourself. It will take about an hour and a half to finish the job.

Disconnect the negative battery cable. Use a wrench to loosen the nut on the terminal.

Place the wheel chocks behind the back tires of the car and jack the automobile up using the automobile jack. Place a jack stand under the car near the jacking point and raise it up to the frame of the car.

Remove the radiator lower air deflector using a wrench to remove the bolts.

Take the cover off the torque converter using a socket and ratchet to remove the bolts.

Label the wires on the starter using the marker and masking tape to note the proper location of each one. Disconnect the wires using a wrench to remove the nuts and pull the wires away from the starter.

Remove the starter from the engine by loosening the bolts with a ratchet and socket. Put the new starter in place and tighten the bolts with the socket and ratchet.

Connect the electrical wires to the starter according to how you labeled them. Tighten the nuts with a wrench.

Replace the cover on the torque converter and tighten the bolts with a socket and ratchet. Replace the lower radiator air deflector and tighten the bolts with a wrench. Remove the jack stand and lower the car back to the ground.

Connect the battery cable and tighten the nut with a wrench. Start the car and test the installation of the new starter.

Tip

  • Consider replacing the solenoid at the same time as the starter if your car has more than 100,000 miles.

Warning

  • Make sure you disconnect the battery as instructed or you risk electric shock.

Items you will need

About the Author

John Rose has been writing professionally since 1981. Now contributing to various online publications, he specializes in auto repair, home maintenance and similar topics. Rose studied English at Frostburg State University.

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