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How to Change the Oxygen Sensor on 3.3L Dodge

by Jeffrey Caldwell

The 3.3L Dodge engine is a front wheel drive V6 engine that was first introduced in 1990 for use in Dodge mini-vans and front wheel drive cars. The oxygen sensor on these vehicles is a small sensor located in the exhaust manifold. The oxygen sensor measures the amount of unburned oxygen in the exhaust. This measurement allows the engine computer to adjust the air fuel ratio for optimal efficiency.

Removing the Oxygen Sensor

1

Disconnect the ground cable from the negative battery terminal by loosening the retaining bolt with a wrench. Pull the clamp off the terminal.

2

Raise the front of the vehicle using an automotive jack. Support with jack stands placed underneath the front frame.

3

Locate the oxygen sensor. It will be screwed into the intake manifold near the flange that connects the exhaust manifold to the head pipe.

4

Separate the wiring connector on the oxygen sensor from the engine wiring harness, by pressing in both tabs with you hands. Then pull the two sides of the connector apart.

5

Unscrew the oxygen sensor from the exhaust manifold using an oxygen sensor removal socket and breaker bar. The oxygen sensor socket features a slot along the side to facilitate removing the socket without damaging the wiring harness.

Installing the Oxygen Sensor

1

Screw the new oxygen sensor into the exhaust manifold, using the oxygen sensor socket.

2

Plug the oxygen sensor wiring connector onto the engine wiring harness connector using your hand.

3

Lower the vehicle.

4

Reconnect the ground cable to the negative battery terminal by sliding the clamp over the terminal. Tighten the retaining bolt using a wrench.

Tip

  • Do not drop the new sensor or allow the tip of the sensor to come in contact with any dirt oil or grease. Doing so could damage the sensor or cause it to fail prematurely.

Warnings

  • Always follow the instructions listed in the owners manual when lifting or lowering a vehicle. Failure to do so could cause injury or death.
  • Wait until the engine and exhaust are completely cooled before beginning this repair. Failure to do so could cause burns.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Jeffrey Caldwell has been a freelance writer for over five months and has published over 250 articles on websites like eHow and Trails.com. Caldwell writes articles on a wide range of topics including travel, camping and automotive mechanics. He has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Millersville University.

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