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How to Change the Engine Oil for a 2003 Kawasaki Concours

by Chris Gilliland

Kawasaki's 2003 ZG1000 Concours was built as a sport-touring motorcycle, combining comfort with enough power to thrill riders during a long-distance adventure. The Concours relied on liquid- and oil-cooling to keep its 997 cc Ninja-inspired engine cool, placing a high demand on the engine's supply of oil as engine temperatures rise. Over time, the oil will begin to degrade and allow friction to build up within the engine. Changing the oil every 6,000 miles will ensure that the engine is lubricated at all times, reducing the risk of mechanical failure and prolonging the engine's life.

Select a flat, level work surface and lift your Concours onto its center stand.

Remove the lower fairing from your Concours. Unscrew the bolts from the top of the fairing, using a socket wrench and a 10 mm socket, and the lower screws with a Phillips screwdriver. Lower the fairing away from the engine, then pull it out from under the motorcycle.

Clean the area surround the oil drain plugs, positioned under the front, left-side of the engine, with a parts cleaning spray. Place an oil drain pan below the oil drain plugs.

Start the engine and let it idle for three minutes. Stop the engine, then let it cool for at least 10 minutes. Do not lower the motorcycle off of its center stand.

Unscrew the oil filler cap from the left side of the engine, just forward of the shifter lever. Unscrew both plugs with a 17 mm socket and a socket wrench. Let the engine oil drain for at least five minutes.

Remove the O-rings from both drain plugs. Wipe the drain plug threads and tips with a shop rag, then slip new O-rings over the drain plug threads. Screw the oil drain plugs into the engine crankcase by hand, once the oil has drained completely. Tighten both drain plugs to 22 foot-pounds, using a torque wrench and a 17 mm socket. Wipe away any remaining oil from the engine crankcase.

Unscrew the bolt from the round oil filter cover on the bottom of the engine crankcase, using a 17 mm socket and a socket wrench. Pull the cover off the crankcase. Reach into the engine and pull the oil filter off of the oil pump, if it has not fallen out with the filter cover.

Check the oil filter cover to ensure that the oil filter spring is attached to the flange on the cover's inner face. If the spring is missing, it will be attached to the oil filter. Pull the spring off of the filter and push it onto the oil filter cover flange. Push the new oil filter into the engine, then reinstall the oil filter cover. Tighten the oil filter bolt to 14.5 foot-pounds, using a torque wrench and a 17 mm socket.

Fill the engine with 3 quarts of 20W-50 engine oil through the oil filler neck on the left side of the engine crankcase. Screw the oil filler cap into place by hand.

Slide the lower fairing under your Concours, then lift it into place. Install the fairing's upper bolts with a 10 mm socket and a socket wrench, then screw the lower fairing bolts into place with a Phillips screwdriver.

Start your Concours and let it idle for three minutes on its center stand. Stop the motor, then let the new oil settle for another five minutes.

Check the oil level through the round oil level gauge built into the right engine crankcase cover, visible above the lower fairing. The oil level should be between the gauge's upper and lower marks when warmed. If the oil level is below the lower mark, unscrew the oil filler cap and pour in 1 to 2 oz. of 20W-50 engine oil until the oil level has raised sufficiently.

Lower your Concours from its center stand and park it on its kick stand., if desired.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

An avid motorcyclist, Chris Gilliland has immersed himself into the two-wheeled world while balancing work life and raising three daughters. When he is not managing the parts department of a local, multi-line motorcycle dealership, Gilliland can often be found riding, writing or working on his motorcycle blog, Wingman's Garage.

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