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How to Change Out a PT Cruiser Input Shaft Speed Sensor

by Cayden Conor

The input speed sensor on a PT Cruiser generates a voltage signal as it rotates. The teeth of the input clutch pass by the sensor's coil to generate the voltage. The signal tells the powertrain/transmission control module how fast the input shaft is rotating. The PCM/TCM compares the input speed signal with the output speed signal, then uses the information to determine the transmission gear ratio, the speed ration error detection, torque converter clutch slippage and torque converter element speed ratio.

Disconnect the negative battery cable, using the wrench, then set it aside, ensuring that it does not touch metal. Disconnect the positive battery cable and set it aside. Loosen the clamps on the air cleaner duct, using the screwdriver. Remove the duct, then unbolt and remove the air cleaner assembly, using the appropriate socket.

Remove the battery hold-down clamp, using the appropriate socket. Remove the battery. Unbolt and remove the battery tray, using the appropriate socket. Unplug the input speed sensor's wiring harness connector. Unscrew the sensor, using the appropriate wrench. Ensure that the weather seal does not fall off or remain in the old sensor.

Ensure that the new O-ring is in its proper position on the new sensor. Screw the input speed sensor into the transmission, and tighten it firmly. Do not over tighten the sensor, as you will damage the sensor.

Reinstall the battery tray. Install the battery and its hold-down clamp. Reinstall the air cleaner assembly and the air duct. Reconnect the positive battery cable. Reconnect the negative battery cable.

Items you will need

About the Author

Cayden Conor has been writing since 1996. She has been published on several websites and in the winter 1996 issue of "QECE." Conor specializes in home and garden, dogs, legal, automotive and business subjects, with years of hands-on experience in these areas. She has an Associate of Science (paralegal) from Manchester Community College and studied computer science, criminology and education at University of Tampa.

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