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4EFTE Engine Specifications

by William Bronleigh

The Toyota E-Series engine may have started out as just another reliable four-cylinder from a manufacturer known for them, but that didn't stop Toyota from twisting it to performance use. The JDM 4E-FTE may not be the best known of turbocharged Toyota engines, but it's earned an impressive cult following as a retrofit for other E-series Tercels and Corollas not blessed with the boosted performance of their overseas Starlet and Glanza cousins.

General Engine Specifications

The 4EFTE engine was throttle-body fuel injected, had a displacement of 1,331 cc, and featured dual overhead camshafts. Ignition duty was handled by a distributor, and a Toyota-produced CT9 turbo provided the boost. An electrically controlled wastegate set the boost at either 5.8 psi or 9.4 psi, depending on the setting. The spark plug gap distance is 0.22 inches.

Engine Internal Specifications

The 4EFTE engine had 16 valves, four per cylinder. These valves were oriented at 25 degrees, and the combustion chamber had a volume of 39 cc. The compression ratio was 8.2-to-1, and the bore and stroke measurement is 74.0 by 77.4 mm. The head gasket measured 1.2 mm thick.

Engine Performance Specifications

The 4EFTE engine that powers the Starlet GT and Glanza produces 135 horsepower at 6,400 rpm and 116 foot-pounds of torque at 4,800 rpm. In the JDM Starlet, this was good for an 8.2-second sprint to 60 mph. In stock form, performance might not be considered stunning by today's standards -- but that's easily remedied. These engines are good for well over 400 horsepower with the right combination of aftermarket parts.

About the Author

William Bronleigh has been writing professionally since 2010. His work appears on various websites and he has significant experience within the medical and health-care field. Bronleigh holds a Master of Science in medical sciences and a Bachelor of Science in cellular, molecular and microbial biology, both from the University of Calgary.

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