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4.0 SOHC Engine Specifications

by Justin Cupler

Ford first introduced the 4.0-liter single-overhead-cam (SOHC) engine in 2001, as a replacement for the over-head-valve (OHV) 4.0-liter. Only the Ranger and Explorer made use of this engine, from 2001 through 2004. In 2005, the Mustang, a staple in Ford's lineup, dropped the 3.8-liter engine in favor of this 4.0 liter. These three vehicles ran with the 4.0 liter through 2010; in 2011 the Mustang and Explorer switched to newer, more powerful, engines, but the 2011 Ranger makes use of the 4.0-liter SOHC.

Internals

The 4.0-liter SOHC engine--a V-6 engine--has a bore (cylinder width) of 3.95 inches and a stroke (the distance the piston travels inside the cylinder) of 3.32 inches. The bore and stroke combine to create a total engine displacement of 245 cubic inches. The 4.0 liter has a compression ratio ranging from 9:1 to 9.7:1, depending on the year and model of vehicle. The total valve count of 12 means that there are two valves per cylinder, one intake and one exhaust.

Output

The output number of the 4.0 liter varied slightly depending on which vehicle it was used with. When fitted into the Ford Explorer, this engine produces 210 horsepower at 5,100 rpm and 254 foot-pounds of torque at 3,700 rpm. In the 2005 through 2010 Ford Mustang, the 4.0 produces 210 horsepower at 5,300 rpm and 240 foot-pounds of torque at 3,500 rpm. When installed in the Ford Ranger, the 4.0 liter produces its lowest output, 207 horsepower at 5,250 rpm and 238 foot-pounds of torque at 3,000 rpm.

Economy

The fuel economy of this V-6 engine ranged greatly depending on the application. In the Ford Explorer, the 4.0 got 14 to 16 mpg in the city and 20 to 21 mpg on the highway. In the Ford Ranger, the 4.0-liter got 15 to 17 mpg in the city and 19 to 21 mpg on the highway. The 2005 through 2010 Mustang used the 4.0-liter most efficiently, getting 17 to 19 mpg in the city and 26 to 28 mpg on the highway.

About the Author

Justin Cupler is a professional writer who has been published on several websites including CarsDirect and Autos.com. Cupler has worked in the professional automotive repair field as a technician and a manager since 2000. He has a certificate in broadcast journalism from the Connecticut School of Broadcasting. Cupler is currently studying mechanical engineering at Saint Petersburg College.

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