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1993 Nissan D21 Pickup 2.4L Specs

by Justin Cupler

Nissan began manufacturing trucks in 1959, offering a relief to the gas-guzzling V8 trucks of the era. The initial Nissan pickup was the Datsun 1000, the first ever compact pickup truck. This truck spawned several other remakes of itself until the late-1960s. In 1979, Nissan moved to a new plant based in Tennessee and produced a new truck, the Hardbody or D21 for short. The 1993 model had several trim lines and engines available, the base-engine being the 2.4-liter.

Engine

The 2.4-liter base engine on the Nissan D21 has a bore of 3.50 inches, a stroke of 3.78 inches and a compression ratio of 8.6:1. It has four cylinders in a direct line, known as an inline four-cylinder (I-4). It has 12 valves in a single overhead cam (SOHC) configuration. This engine produces 134 horsepower at 5,200 RPM and 154 foot-pounds of torque at 3,600 RPM.

Fuel

The fuel economy on this compact truck varies depending on the options selected. With four-wheel drive, it gets 18 miles per gallon in the city and 22 MPG on the highway. With two-wheel drive, it gets 21 to 23 MPG in the city and 26 to 27 on the highway, depending on transmission options. All four-cylinder models of the Nissan D21 have a 15.6-gallon fuel tank.

Exterior

With several exterior options, the size of the 1993 Nissan D21 varies slightly. The truck ranges in overall length from 174.6 to 190 inches, has a width between 65 and 66.7 inches and a height ranging from 62 to 67.1 inches. The wheelbase also varies, from 104.3 to 116.1 inches in length. The curb weight, which is the weight of the truck without fuel or passengers, ranges from 2,755 lbs. to 3,490 lbs.

Interior

The 1993 Nissan D21 offers seating for three passengers in the regular cab and four with the King Cab. Depending on the cab, the truck has 39.3 inches of front headroom, 42.2 to 42.6 inches of front legroom, 55.2 to 54.4 inches of front shoulder room and 52.2 to 55.1 inches of front hip room.

About the Author

Justin Cupler is a professional writer who has been published on several websites including CarsDirect and Autos.com. Cupler has worked in the professional automotive repair field as a technician and a manager since 2000. He has a certificate in broadcast journalism from the Connecticut School of Broadcasting. Cupler is currently studying mechanical engineering at Saint Petersburg College.

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