Thinking about purchasing a new car? Use our new Car Loan Calculator to estimate your monthly car payment!

1979 GMC Sierra Specs

by Ron Brow

The Sierra is a product of the General Motor Company from 1975. This is a full-size pickup truck produced for the Chevrolet C/K trim. The name Sierra was used to distinguish the various trims that were being offered, like the Sierra Classic and Sierra Grande. The letter K denoted the model, which was a four-wheel drive, and the letter C denoted the rear-wheel-drive models.

Production

Production of these vehicles halted in 1999, but was revived in 2003. There was not much done in 1979 insofar as the production of the Sierra was concerned, except for some minor changes to the body of the vehicle. It kept the engine from the previous year. This truck is normally favored by farmers and construction workers.

Specifications

The truck adopted the engine from 1978, which is a 350-cubic-inch (5.7L) lightweight engine that has 8 cylinders in a V format (V8) with an arrangement of two valves per cylinder, thus making it a 16-valve engine. It is capable of a power output of 125 horsepower at 3,600 revs per minute, and the torque rating is 225 foot-pounds at 1,800 rpm. The engine block is made of cast iron, with the cylinder heads made of aluminum alloys. The fuel type for this engine is diesel, using an indirect fuel-injection system. The bore and stroke measure 4.057 inches and 3.385 inches respectively. The compression ratio on this diesel engine is 22.5:1. It has a four-speed automatic transmission gearbox. It uses a chain-driven single-overhead camshaft.

Exterior

The 1979 Sierra had an extension of the wheelbase to give a short wheelbase of 117.5 inches and a long wheelbase of 131.5 inches. There was also an option of a super-long wheelbase of 164.5 inches. The grille of the Sierra was also modified. It looked like the previous grille, except that the parking lights were now incorporated into the headlight facade in front of the grille. There was also the introduction of a fifth color option, known as oyster, to the ones already existing.

About the Author

Ron Brow began freelance writing in 2003. She has written articles for publications such as the "Chicago Defender" and the "Atlanta Journal." Brow received her Bachelor of Arts in mass communication from the University of Chicago.

More Articles