How to Wash a Black Car Without Scratching It

by Kim Linton

The secret to washing a black car without scratching it is to avoid contaminating the cleaning tools. Even tiny pieces of grit or debris can cause noticeable scratches in the paint. Harsh commercial cleaning solutions can also damage the car's finish. Use gentle, organic products and avoid commercial car washes to keep your black car looking like new.

Add one-quarter to one-half cup of car-wash solution to one of the buckets, then fill it with warm water. Fill the other bucket with plain water.

Rinse the car and wheels using a light fan spray. The goal is to loosen the dirt, not grind it in. Remove any tar stains with a commercial tar remover.

Dip one sheep-skin mitt into the soapy solution. Wash a small area of the car, but don't rub too hard. If you pick up pieces of dirt or sand with the mitt, rinse it in clear water before you continue.

Dip the second sheep skin mitt into the bucket with plain water, then rinse the section you just washed. When the water becomes cloudy, empty the bucket and refill it with clean water.

Dry the car using a chamois, then follow up with a micro-fiber cloth. If you drop the chamois or cloth, switch to clean ones to avoid scratching the paint.

Apply your favorite car polish or wax according to manufacturer's directions. Waxing your car several times each year will help protect the finish and make the car easier to clean.

Tips

  • check Wash the car in a shaded area. Avoid direct sunlight and high heat.
  • check Keep a clean micro fiber cloth in the car to remove dust between washes. Do not try to remove other substances that might scratch the surface.

Items you will need

About the Author

Kim Linton is a political analyst, computer technician and ministry advocate who has been writing for the Web since 2001. Her work has been featured on major news sites including "The Wall Street Journal" and "USA Today," and has been published on a variety of niche sites including "Woman's Day" and "Intel." Linton holds degrees in business and marketing from Indiana University.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera Dawn Allynn