How to Use Eggs to Stop a Radiator Leak

by William Nagel

The radiator keeps your vehicle's engine cool during a drive; but when your radiator is leaking coolant, the engine can overheat and suffer serious damage. If you are far from a garage and your radiator is leaking, you can use eggs to patch small holes and temporarily plug the leaks. Heat from the radiator will cook the egg whites, and pressure will force the eggs into the holes, fixing the leaks long enough to take your car to a garage for repairs.

Allow the radiator to cool. Test the temperature of the radiator by carefully touching the radiator hose; do not continue if the radiator hose is still hot.

Cover the radiator cap with a towel or rag, and slowly twist the cap to open the radiator. Let any steam dissipate before fully opening the radiator.

Crack an egg gently into two halves over the bowl. Pour the yolk back and forth between the shell halves, and let only the white run into the bowl.

Pour the egg white from the bowl into the radiator.

Repeat Steps 3 and 4 for the remaining eggs. Separate and pour the whites into the radiator one at a time; if you spill the yolk, you won't ruin all of the whites.

Screw the cap radiator cap back into place, and make sure it is secure before starting your car.

Tips

  • check If you do not have a towel or rag, use an article of your clothing to protect your hands from the hot steam when opening the radiator cap.
  • check Egg whites will temporarily plug only small holes and punctures in a radiator. Large holes, gashes and collision damage cannot be repaired this way.

Warnings

  • close Exercise extreme caution when opening the radiator. Unscrew the cap slowly. If excessive amounts of steam begin to hiss out from under the cap, then the radiator is still too hot to open. Tighten the cap and wait. A hot, pressurized radiator will cause serious burns.
  • close Do not attempt to use egg whites as a permanent repair for your radiator. Take your car to the nearest garage for professional repairs to prevent damage to your engine from overheating.

Items you will need

About the Author

William Nagel is a graduate of the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he studied science, technology and culture. He has been writing since 2007 and specializes in computer hardware, operating systems and software documentation. His work has been published in the "North Avenue Review."