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Types of Oil for a Suzuki LT500 Engine

by Ron Brow

The Suzuki LT500, a quad bike commonly known by the name Quadzilla, is a "Quadracer" with high-performance racing conditions. Suzuki manufactured this Quadzilla between 1987 and 1990; the 1987 Suzuki LT500 model was known as the H-model. This quad came fitted with a high-performance two-stroke, liquid-cooled engine.

Lubrication

The Suzuki LT500 engine uses an oil premix; Suzuki recommends using Yamalube 2M or Yamalube 2R two-cycle engine oil. The engine oil lubricates the combustion engine, acts as a cleanser and prevents rusting inside the engine.

Yamalube 2 Motor Oil

The Yamalube 2 stroke motor oil is synthetic engine oil used for two-stroke petrol engines. The oil has a somewhat green color and a mild petroleum odor. It incorporates petroleum, distillates, refined heavy paraffins and hydrocarbon distillates. This oil has a special blend of base oil, detergents, dispersants and elements that improve its viscosity. Its special additives help maintain flow and also prevent gelling in colder weather whilst also improving lubrication in colder conditions. This oil causes little emission of smoke; it reduces the amount of smoke emitted by about 50 percent. It also reduces carbon buildup, thereby enhancing engine life and performance.

Non-Phosphorous Oil

This oil, premixed with gas in the LT500's engine, helps protect the catalytic converter. It also has chemicals that help protect the engine against rust. Premixing will require a 32-to-1 gas-to-oil ratio for best performance; this ratio helps improve the lubrication of the lower end bearings, rod bearings and cylinder wall. The mixing ratio can vary from a range of 16 to 1 to as high as 100 to 1, however.

About the Author

Ron Brow began freelance writing in 2003. She has written articles for publications such as the "Chicago Defender" and the "Atlanta Journal." Brow received her Bachelor of Arts in mass communication from the University of Chicago.

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