Specifications on the 1988 Mustang GT

by Andy Joseph

The 1988 Ford Mustang is one of the model-year entries of the third generation of production for the iconic pony car. Of its two trims, the GT is the higher-end version. The GT is available as a hatchback and convertible.

Engines and Transmissions

The GT trim features the more powerful 4.9-liter, 225-horsepower V-8 engine with 300 foot-pounds of torque and a compression ratio of 9 to 1. Although the standard transmission is a five-speed manual overdrive, there is an option to get a four-speed automatic overdrive. The 1988 GT can hit 0 to 60 miles per hour in 6.4 seconds.

Fuel Economy

The 1988 Ford Mustang GT achieves 16 miles per gallon (mpg) for city driving and 24 mpg for highway driving. It has worse gas mileage than the LX version, which offers a fuel economy of 25/30 mpg.

Interior

The 1988 Ford Mustang GT has a cabin big enough to accommodate up to four people. The hatchback and convertible have roughly the same amount of leg room, as well as front shoulder and front hip room. However, the hatchback offers a little more rear shoulder and rear hip room than the convertible, while the convertible comes with more front and rear head room than the hatchback.

Exterior

As a two-door vehicle, the 1988 Ford Mustang GT is 180 inches long, 69 inches wide and 52 inches tall, with a 101-inch wheelbase. Curb weight is 3,193 for the hatchback and 3,329 pounds for the convertible, and it features 15-inch alloy wheels and a turning diameter of 41 feet. The 1988 Mustang GT comes in the following colors: Black, Dark Grey Metallic, Light Grey, Bright and Cabernet Red, Medium Shadow Blue Metallic, Tropical Yellow, Dark Shadow and Bright Regatta Blue Metallic and Oxford White.

Price Range

The original manufacturer's suggested retail price for the 1988 Ford Mustang GT hatchback was $12,745, while that of the convertible was $16,610. As of April 2010, a 1988 Mustang GT can be purchased within the $3,000 to $8,000 range.

About the Author

Based in the D.C. area, Andy Joseph works full-time as a data analyst and technical writer. He has been writing articles about technology, health, politics, music, culture and automobiles since 2007. His work has appeared in The Express, Congressional Report and Road & Track. He has a master's degree in journalism and technology management.