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Specifications of 1987 Ford E150 Trucks

by Andy Josiah

The Ford Motor Company produced the 1987 Ford E-150 as the half-ton version of a full-size van known as the E-Series, or Econoline (the other versions were the three-quarter-ton E-250 and the one-ton E-350). The '87 E-150 appeared during the van's third production cycle, which lasted from 1975 to 1991, and is best known for its truck-like chassis. The E-Series went virtually unchanged during each generation of production, and the third generation -- which included the '87 vans -- was no exception.

Models and Engine Specs

Ford produced the 1987 E-150 in three models: a regular E-150, a version of the van with an extended wheelbase (E-150 Extended) and a slightly taller version called the E-150 Super. Each model received a 4.9-liter in-line six-cylinder engine, which produced 145 horsepower and 265 foot-pounds of torque. Also, it had a multi-point fuel injection system, a bore and stroke of 4.0 by 3.98 inches and a compression ratio of 8.8-to-1.

Transmission, Fuel Capacity and Interior Spacing

The 1987 Ford E-150 had a four-speed automatic transmission with overdrive. While the regular E-150 had an 18-gallon gas tank, that of the Extended and Super versions surpass that capacity by four gallons. The van had 41.5 inches of front headroom and 39.5 inches of front legroom.

Exterior Specifications

All 1987 E-150s had three doors, 15-inch wheels, and a width of 79.9 inches. The regular E-150 had a wheelbase of 124 inches, a length of 186.8 inches and a height of 79.2 inches. While the E-150 Extended and Super shared the same 138-inch wheelbase and 206.8-inch length, the Extended had a 80.1-inch height while the Super was 80.6 inches tall.

About the Author

Andy Josiah started writing professionally in 2006. He has worked for companies such as CarsDirect and Rainking. Josiah holds a Bachelor of Arts in history from the University of Maryland and a Master of Professional Studies in journalism from Georgetown University.

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