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Slant 6 Engine Specifications

by Julia Salgado

The Slant 6 was a six-cylinder engine produced by the Chrysler Motor Company in 1960. Its cylinders were arranged in the unique "slant 6" configuration that gave the engine its name. The introduction of the Hyper-Pak hugely increased the engines power output and helped Chrysler sweep the board in a special NASCAR race for six-cylinder compact cars, held at Daytona. However, the Hyper-Pak was phased out as Chrysler focused on a more reliable and fuel efficient family vehicle.

170 Cubic Inch Version

The 170 cubic inch version of the Slant 6 engine was produced between 1960 and 1969. It had a power output of 101 horsepower. This was increased to 148 horsepower by the introduction of the Hyper Pac between 1960 and 1961. The bore of this engine was 3.4 inches and it had a piston stoke of 3.125 inches. The cylinder block of the 170 engine was unique to this engine size and had a part number of 2463395. The 170's crankshaft was part No. 2843941 and had main bearing journal diameter of 2.75 inches and a crank pin diameter of 2.189 inches.

198 Cubic Inch Version

The 198 cubic inch Slant 6 was produced for only three years, between 1970 and 1973. It had the same bore as the 170's 3.4 inches but had longer stroke at 3.64 inches. The 198 had a different cylinder block to its smaller brother, and this had a part number of 2951694. The 198 also had a different crank to the 170, with a part No. of 2951979 but shared 170's the main bearing journal diameter of 2.75 inches and crank pin diameter of 2.189 inches.

225 Cubic Inch Version

The 225 cubic inch Slant 6 enjoyed the longest production run of all, being manufactured between 1960 and 1983. The 225 engine produced 145 horsepower, which was increased when the Hyper-Pak was introduced in late 1960 but decreased again when the focus of the Slant 6 shifted from high-power to fuel economy and reliability. The 225 had the 3.40-inch bore of the 170 and the 198, but its stroke length was longer still at 4.12 inches. Until 1974, the 225 shared the same cylinder block as the 198, before changing to a new block with the part No. 3462605. The crank of the 225 would fit in the engine of the 198 and shared its crankshaft specs.

About the Author

Julia Salgado has been writing professionally since 2007. Her work has been published by the "Manchester Evening News" and "Q Magazine." Salgado holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Manchester Metropolitan University.

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