How to Secure a Hubcap

by Drenee Brown

Hubcaps or wheel covers are decorative disks that cover the center of the tire. Originally these disks that were made from aluminum were meant to cover the lug nuts and protect them from dirt and rust. The lug nuts are what secures the tires on the car. Today they add to the decoration and the style of the car. Hub caps generally snap on top of the wheel by tapping around the edges gently. There are times when the hubcap will fall off. Most times it due to hitting a curb or going into an unexpected pot hole.

Purchase hubcaps that have a clip-on retention feature. The clip is designed to groove into the wheel. The other style used to prevent your hubcap from falling off has a bolt-on feature. According to Car Tech Auto-Parts, "This feature is designed with a threaded fastener that supports the hubcap in place. In some cases, a plastic washer (connected to the lug nut) could be used instead."

Use a rubber mallet to tap around the edges of the hubcap. Hubcaps on older model cars can wear down over time. Each time the hubcap is removed and applied back to the wheel, the metal grooves wear down. The inner edges may need to be bent outward to intensify the grip of the hubcap. Bending the inner edge metal outward with a pair of pliers and using a rubber mallet to tap around the edges will secure the hubcap to the wheel.

Purchase hubcaps that are the correct size for the vehicle. Sometimes the hubcap is replaced with one that is not meant for the make and model of the car. A hubcap that does not fit correctly will fall off. All hubcaps are not interchangeable. Secure your hubcaps by purchasing hubcaps designed for the make and model of your car.

Items you will need

About the Author

Drenee Brown began writing online articles in 2006, contributing to various websites. She is a former Six Sigma specialist and received her certification through Ford Motor Company Lean Academy. She is also an entrepreneur and president of an electrical contracting company in Atlanta. She holds an Associate of Arts in communications from Sawyer Business School.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera rainy day lost hubcap image by Christopher Martin from Fotolia.com