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How to Replace the Oxygen Sensor on a Ford

by G.K. Bayne

The oxygen (O2) sensor is a device that monitors the presence of oxygen in the exhaust gases of a motor vehicle. The sensor produces an electrical voltage in relation to the amount of oxygen present in the exhaust. This sensor is generally located on the exhaust pipe before the catalytic converter. Some Ford models use two sensors. One sensor placed before the catalytic converter and another after the converter. In both instances the replacement methods are the same. By following a basic procedure, replacing the oxygen sensor on your Ford takes only a few minutes and will keep some cash in your pocket.

Remove the negative battery cable from the battery. This will disable the Ford car's electrical system.

Use the car jack and raise the vehicle high enough so you can comfortably reach the underside of the Ford vehicle.

Place the jack stand under the outer edge of the car frame to additionally support the vehicle. Never rely on a car jack alone to support the heavy weight of a vehicle. Always use one or two jack stands in addition to the car jack.

Locate the O2 sensor and spray the area around the threads with the spray lubricant. The lubricant will take a few minutes to soak in and will help in loosening the tight-fitting sensor.

Disconnect the electrical plug from the sensor.

Use the special sensor tool or the 7/8-inch or 22-mm end wrench and remove the sensor from the exhaust pipe.

Coat the threads of the new oxygen sensor liberally with the anti-seize compound. This will aid in the installation of the new sensor by lubricating the threads.

Install the new sensor with the tool or end wrench.

Reconnect the electrical plug to the sensor.

Remove the jack stands and lower the car to the ground with the jack. Replace the negative battery terminal and start the car.

Warning

  • Wear safety glasses and a cap when working under a fully supported vehicle. Dirt, mud and other debris can coat the underside of any vehicle making dirt fall down around and on you.

Items you will need

About the Author

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