How to Replace a Ford 2.5 Timing Belt

by Cayden Conor

The 2.5L engine comes in the 1998 through 2000 Ford Ranger. The engine is a freewheeling engine, which means that the tolerances are not so close as to cause extensive engine damage should the belt stretch past the scope of the tensioner. It takes about three hours to replace the timing belt, and special tools are needed, which are available at any Ford dealership. Ford has not recommended a specific interval to change the timing belt, but previous use and service history dictates that it should be changed every 60,000 miles.

1

Hook the air conditioning reclaimer up to the air conditioning system, if you have a reclaimer. If not, have a shop reclaim the Freon. It is illegal to discharge Freon into the atmosphere.

2

Disconnect the battery cable and lay it aside, but do not let it touch metal. Remove the cooling fan shroud using the appropriate sockets. Loosen the water pump pulley bolts using the appropriate socket or wrench. Loosen the accessory drive belt tensioners using the appropriate socket, allowing the belt to slacken. Lift the belts off the pulleys. Remove the water pump pulley bolts, water pump pulley and the radiator cooling fan using the appropriate sockets or wrenches.

3

Remove the air compressor by unscrewing the lines and unbolting it from its bracket. Remove the power steering pump, but leave the lines connected. Just lay it out of the way. Remove the air compressor mounting bracket and crankshaft pulley bolt using the appropriate sockets. Remove the crankshaft pulley using the puller. Remove the timing cover retaining bolt and the timing belt cover using the appropriate sockets.

4

Turn the crankshaft clockwise until it is lined up. The timing marks on the crankshaft sprocket line up at the 1 o’clock position. The timing marks on the camshaft line up at the 5 o’clock position. If the crankshaft timing mark lines up, but the camshaft mark doesn’t, turn the crankshaft one more turn, and both will line up. The timing mark (diamond) on the oil pump sprocket should also line up.

5

Loosen the tensioner pivot bolt. Loosen the tensioner adjusting bolt slowly. Turn the tensioner clockwise using the tensioner tool, thus releasing tension from the timing belt. Turn the tensioner until it is against the stop, then tighten the tensioner adjusting bolt just enough to hold the tensioner in place. Lift the timing belt off the sprockets. Check that all three timing marks are still lined up.

6

Install the timing belt in a counterclockwise direction, starting on the crankshaft sprocket. Route the belt around the oil pump and over the camshaft sprocket, keeping the belt taut. Work the belt down behind the tensioner pulley. The belt will be looser on the tensioned side. Loosen the tensioner adjusting bolt.

7

Turn the crankshaft clockwise two turns until the timing marks line up again. Tighten the tensioner adjusting bolt to 27 foot-pounds of torque. Tighten the tensioner pivot bolt to 35 foot-pounds of torque.

8

Install the rest of the parts in reverse order of removal. If you had a shop remove the Freon, have the shop put the Freon back into the system with the reclaimer. If you used your own reclaimer, refill the system with Freon from your reclaimer. Tighten the crankshaft pulley bolt to 115 foot-pounds of torque.

Tips

  • check A reclaimer is an expensive piece of equipment that the average person does not have laying around in his garage. If you do not have one, a shop will remove the Freon for you, but make sure the shop agrees to put the Freon back into the vehicle without charging you for the Freon.
  • check If the air conditioning system is not working because the Freon leaked out, you can skip Step 1 and just remove the air conditioning lines (there is no Freon in the system to leak out).

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Cayden Conor has been writing since 1996. She has been published on several websites and in the winter 1996 issue of "QECE." Conor specializes in home and garden, dogs, legal, automotive and business subjects, with years of hands-on experience in these areas. She has an Associate of Science (paralegal) from Manchester Community College and studied computer science, criminology and education at University of Tampa.

Photo Credits

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