How to Replace a Dodge Durango Drum Brake

by Christian Killian

The rear brakes on your Dodge Durango use a drum-and-shoe system to provide roughly 30 to 40 percent of the stopping force for the truck. Because they are on the rear of the truck, the transfer of weight when stopping shifts most of the force away from them and to the front disc brakes. The result is a brake shoe and drum that do not wear as fast as the brakes in the front. It is not often that a drum needs replacing but over time they can wear or crack and then they will require replacement.

1

Loosen the lug nuts on the rear of your Durango with a lug wrench or a socket and breaker bar. Do not remove them from the wheel studs yet.

2

Raise the rear of the truck off the ground with a jack under the rear axle housing. Place a set of jack stands under the axle tube to support the weight of the truck. Remove the lug nuts and wheels from the truck.

3

Grasp the brake drum with your hands and remove it from the truck, pulling it straight out. Set the old drum aside, then slide the new drum onto the wheel studs and over the rear brake shoes. If the drum will not slide on you may need to adjust the shoes in a little to allow for the added thickness of the new drum.

4

Move to the opposite side of the truck, remove the drum, and replace it using the same process. Install the wheels onto the truck followed by the lug nuts. Tighten them until they are snug.

5

Raise the rear of the truck off the jack stands and pull them out from under the truck. Lower the jack, setting the truck back on its tires. Tighten all the lug nuts with a lug wrench or socket and breaker bar.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Christian Killian has been a freelance journalist/photojournalist since 2006. After many years of working in auto parts and service positions, Killian decided to move into journalism full-time. He has been published in "1st Responder News" as well as in other trade magazines and newspapers in the last few years.

Photo Credits

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