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How to Replace the Front Brake Line on a Ford F-150

by Mike Aguilar

The front brake lines on your Ford F-150 truck carry brake fluid pressure to and from the front disc calipers. Over time, the brake lines may leak. If the hose leaks, you will lose brake fluid pressure when trying to stop, making it harder for you to stop your truck. A leaking or cracked brake line can be changed in less than an hour.

Slide the jack under the frame of the truck just behind the front wheel being worked on. Lift the truck until the wheel is just making contact with the ground. Loosen the lug nuts by turning them counterclockwise with the lug wrench. Lift the truck high enough for the wheel to clear the ground. Place the jack stand under the frame behind the jack and carefully lower the truck onto the jack. Remove the wheel and set it aside.

Turn the steering wheel to expose the brake line fitting on the caliper and the connection at the frame. Remove the brake line from the brake caliper by turning the fitting counterclockwise with a flare nut wrench.

Grip both sides of the connection to the metal brake tubing with flare nut wrenches and turn the brake hose fitting counterclockwise to remove it. Using the new copper seal provided, connect the new line to the tubing by turning it clockwise. Tighten the flare nut to the tubing to between 20 and 30 foot-pounds.

Slide a new copper seal over the caliper connector and thread it onto the caliper. Tighten it to between 20 and 30 foot-pounds. Straighten the steering wheel.

Install the wheel and thread the lug nuts onto the studs by turning them clockwise until finger tight. Lift the truck off the stand and remove the stand. Lower the truck until the wheel just contacts the ground. Torque the lug nuts to 120 foot-pounds in a crossover or star pattern. Lower the truck and remove the wheel chocks.

Tips

  • Spraying both connectors with WD-40 will free up stuck connections.
  • You will need to bleed the brakes to get the air out of the brake line.

Warning

  • Wear safety glasses to protect your eyes.

Items you will need

About the Author

Mike Aguilar is a freelance writer with over 30 years of professional experience as a mechanic and over 10 years experience in the construction and home-improvement fields. He also attended an electrical apprenticeship for two years in Santa Clara, Calif., becoming a licensed low-voltage technician.

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