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How to Replace the Alternator in a 2001 Chrysler Sebring

by Brett Johnson

The alternator is a key component of a vehicle's electrical system. The alternator is located on the upper front of the engine and is held in place with two mounting bolts. Its parts move clockwise by the crankshaft pulley using a serpentine belt when the engine is running and generates electrical amperage between 13.5 to 14.5 volts. Its primary function is recharging the battery to generate enough electricity to start the engine and supplying electrical voltage to the vehicles electrical system. A poorly charging alternator will eventually drain your battery and cause the electrical system to fail and stop working. Often a loose or slipping pulley belt can cause the alternator to malfunction.

Disconnect both the positive and negative battery cables using a socket wrench. Unplug the electrical connection located on the back of the alternator.

Remove both the mounting bolts located on either side of the alternator. This will loosen the belt tension allowing for the alternator to be removed. Take out the alternator and compare it with the new one to be certain that you have the correct replacement. Visually inspect the belt for excessive wear and cracking and replace if needed.

Install the replacement alternator and pull the belt over the pulley wheel. Tighten the belt tension by pressing the alternator to one side with a bar or heavy wrench. Insert the mounting bolts and tighten the alternator in place. Allow about ¼ inch of play to remain in the belt, being certain not to over tighten.

Reconnect the electrical alternator plug and both battery cables. Start the vehicle and allow it to run for several minutes to fully charge the replacement alternator. Monitor the battery gauge located on your instrument panel to see if the repair was made successfully.

Return the old alternator to where it was purchased. Some alternators are re-manufactured and you usually can receive a partial refund in exchange for the old unit.

Tip

  • Test your battery before replacing the alternator.

Warning

  • Never perform this repair when on a hot engine.

Items you will need

About the Author

Brett Johnson began writing professionally in 2006. His work includes "The Buyer's Guide to Home Ownership" and training manuals for mortgage banking institutions. Johnson holds an Associate of Arts in business administration from Merritt College-Oakland.

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