How to Replace a 2001 Lincoln LS Starter

by Dan Ferrell

The Lincoln LS was the right car at the wrong time for America's buying public. The LS had a lot going for it. Based on the same solid platform as contemporary Thunderbirds and Jaguar S-Types, it sent optional Jaguar V-8 power to the rear wheels -- unusual for a mid-size of the time. It never managed to compete sales-wise with its competition from Germany, which had enough brand prestige to survive the era's rapidly skyrocketing gas prices. Still, a fine American automobile in itself, even if it did suffer from a terminal case of bad timing.

Removing the Old Starter

1

Connect a memory-saver device to your car's 12-volt outlet or battery terminals per the manufacturer instructions. Disconnect the black battery ground cable with a wrench.

2

Chock the vehicle's rear tires. Jack up the front end with a floor jack, support it with two jack stands. Put on your goggles, get under the vehicle and disconnect the retaining nut from the starter ground strap.

3

Pry off the terminal cover from the rear of the solenoid switch -- the small cylinder mounted on the starter motor -- with a flat-head screwdriver. Unfasten the wire and cable retaining nuts from the rear of the solenoid switch.

4

Loosen the three starter mounting bolts with a ratchet, ratchet extension and socket. Hold the starter firmly with one hand and finish removing the mounting bolts. Remove the starter motor from the vehicle.

Installing the New Starter

1

Position the starter in place and install the three mounting bolts finger tight. Tighten the bolts to 18 foot-pounds with a torque wrench.

2

Connect the wire and cable to the rear of the solenoid switch and tighten the retaining nuts. Replace the solenoid switch terminal cover. Install the ground strap and tighten the retaining nut.

3

Lower your Lincoln off the jack stands with the floor jack and remove the chocks from the rear wheels. Connect the battery ground cable with the wrench.

Items you will need

About the Author

Since 2003 Dan Ferrell has contributed general and consumer-oriented news to television and the Web. His work has appeared in Texas, New Mexico and Miami and on various websites. Ferrell is a certified automation and control technician from the Advanced Technology Center in El Paso, Texas.