How to Remove the Rear Drive Shaft From a Subaru All Wheel Drive

by Christian Killian

Removing the rear drive shaft or propeller shaft from your all-wheel-drive Subaru may vary depending on the model, but the basic system is the same across the Subaru line. The all-wheel-drive system uses a trans axle up front and a gear box with drive shaft in the rear. The rear-drive shaft uses a slip yoke in the front to engage the gear box and a bolt-on flange in the rear where it joins the rear differential. Removal of the shaft can be done with basic tools that most home mechanics have in the garage already.

1

Place the transmission of your car in neutral. Block the front wheels so the car cannot roll while it is on the jack stands.

2

Raise the rear of your Subaru off the ground with a jack. Position a set of jack stands under the car to support the vehicle, then remove the jack.

3

Place a mark on the rear drive shaft mounting flange and a corresponding mark on the mounting flange with a paint pen. These marks will allow you to position the drive shaft and flange in their original positions during reassembly.

4

Locate the four mounting bolts on the rear mounting flange where the drive shaft meets the differential. Remove the four bolts with a wrench and lower the rear of the drive shaft to the ground. You may need to rotate the shaft as you work to access all the bolts.

5

Move forward and locate the center bearing on the drive shaft. Remove the two bolts on either side of the bearing that attach it to the body with a socket and ratchet. Lower the shaft down while continuing to support it at the transmission end.

6

Position a drip pan under the rear of the transmission gear box where the drive shaft attaches to it. Slide the drive shaft out of the gear box, being careful not to damage the oil seal or the splines on the output shaft.

7

Remove the drive shaft from under the car. Place the jack under the rear of the car and raise it off the jack stands. Remove the jack stands and lower the car to the ground.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Christian Killian has been a freelance journalist/photojournalist since 2006. After many years of working in auto parts and service positions, Killian decided to move into journalism full-time. He has been published in "1st Responder News" as well as in other trade magazines and newspapers in the last few years.

Photo Credits

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