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How to Remove the Radiator From a Dodge Diesel

by Allen Moore

A Dodge diesel truck depends on a rather large radiator for the engine cooling needs. Depending on the year and model of your Dodge diesel, the radiator may also house the transmission cooler. The radiator needs to be removed for replacement, should it fail, and may also have to come out for heavy engine repairs or other front-end work. Anyone with basic auto repair experience can remove the radiator from a Dodge diesel truck in less than two hours with the right tools.

Open the hood on the Dodge and place the catch pan on the ground, directly below the lower radiator hose. Climb underneath and loosen the hose clamp on the lower radiator hose where it connects to the radiator, using the socket set.

Pull the lower radiator hose off the radiator by hand and aim the hose end into the catch pan so the coolant in the hose will pour into the pan.

Open the radiator petcock, located on the lower back corner of the radiator, using the pliers, then let the coolant drain from the radiator.

Climb out and loosen the hose clamp on the upper radiator hose where it connects to the radiator, using the socket set. Pull the hose off and aim the hose end down at the catch pan until the coolant has flowed out of the hose and into the pan.

Unbolt the transmission cooler lines from the radiator side tank using the box wrenches if your Dodge Diesel has a transmission cooler in the radiator.

Unbolt the fan shroud and radiator shroud using the socket set. Lift the shrouds off the vehicle and set them aside. Unbolt the radiator from the mounting brackets using the socket set.

Pull the radiator up and out of the Dodge by hand. If you're reinstalling it, make sure to place it somewhere safe as radiators damage easily.

Items you will need

About the Author

Allen Moore's career includes awards in poetry and creative fiction, published lyrics, fiction books and nonfiction articles as well as a master certification in automotive service from the Ford Motor Company. Moore is a contributing writer for RF365.com and various other websites, a ghostwriter for Rainbow Writing and has over a dozen works of fiction currently in print.

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Photo Credits

  • radiator humor image by John Sfondilias from Fotolia.com