How to Remove an Ignition Swich From a Jeep CJ7

by Erin Stewart

The ignition switch in a Jeep CJ7 connects the battery to the starter and, over time, it can wear out or malfunction. Ignition switches cannot be repaired and must be removed and replaced if not working properly. Using a few simple tools, you can remove an ignition switch from a Jeep CJ7, test the wiring harness and replace the ignition switch if necessary.

How to Remove an Ignition Switch From a Jeep CJ7

Locate the ignition switch by inserting the key into the ignition, looking under the dash at the top of the steering column and then turning the key. When you turn the key, you'll see a rod move. Follow the rod down the steering column and it will come to a plastic box. This box is the ignition switch and is typically white.

To determine if your ignition switch is working properly, the first thing to check is the positioning of the switch. Make sure the wiring harness and rod are properly attached. If the rod and wiring harness are in place, remove the ignition switch.

Locate the bolts that attach the ignition switch to the steering column. Typically, there will be only one or two bolts.

Use a socket set to remove the bolts that attach the ignition switch to the steering column.

The ignition switch will also be attached to a wiring harness. Undo the wiring harness and take the ignition switch off the rod.

To test the wiring harness, use a volt meter, ground one end and put each prong on the wiring harness. It should read 12 volts. If the wiring harness has voltage, this means that it is working properly and your ignition switch needs to be replaced.

To replace the ignition switch, purchase a new one and hook it back up to the rod and wiring harness.


  • check Use a flathead screw driver to remove the wiring harness easily from the ignition switch.


  • close You can test the wiring harness to see if it is getting power to the ignition switch, but there is no real way to check the ignition switch itself. In many cases, people think their ignition switch is bad, when actually the problem is a bad fuse.

Items you will need

About the Author

Erin Stewart is a professional editor and copywriter who has served as a newspaper reporter, designer, and news editor, and currently works as part of a dynamic marketing communications team. Erin has a Bachelor of Arts degree in English with an editing minor from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.

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