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How to Remove a Fuel Filter on a Dodge Dakota

by Chris Moore

The Dodge Dakota's fuel filter is a permanent part of the module in the fuel tank that includes the fuel pump and the fuel level sending unit. You can remove this module from the fuel tank, which requires you to remove the tank from the truck, but you can't remove the filter from the assembly. Once removed, you can clean the fuel filter by scrubbing it with clean solvent and a toothbrush. If you can't clean the filter, you need to replace the entire fuel pump/sending unit assembly.

Depressurize the truck's fuel system by removing the fuel pump relay from within the Dakota's fuse box. Crank the engine and let it rum until it stalls, then re-connect the relay.

Disconnect the truck's negative battery cable.

Raise the Dakota's rear end and support it on jack stands. Block the front wheels.

Disconnect the hoses attached to the fuel tank. The filler neck hose often has a clamp you must remove with pliers or a screwdrivers, while the supply lines have quick-connect fittings that you remove by pressing their tabs.

Remove the tank from the truck by raising one or two floor jacks underneath it, unbolting the support straps, lowering the tank and disconnecting the remaining supply lines and electrical connectors from the tank.

Clean the area surrounding the fuel pump unit of any dirt. Compressed air can help.

Tap on the pump module's locking ring with a hammer and brass drift and turn the ring counterclockwise, unscrewing the ring once it comes loose.

Pull the module--with the fuel filter attached--out of the fuel tank. Tilt the module at an angle as you remove it to avoid damaging the float and the float arm.

Tip

  • You should do this at a time when the fuel tank is nearly empty. If not, you must siphon out the fuel into an appropriate gas can using a siphon kit--never by mouth.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Chris Moore has been contributing to eHow since 2007 and is a member of the DFW Writers' Workshop. He received a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from the University of Texas-Arlington.

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  • red truck engine image by Christopher Nolan from Fotolia.com