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How to Remove the Engine in a Pontiac Bonneville

by Robert Good

Removing the engine in your Pontiac Bonneville, with the right tools and correct knowledge, should take part of a day. Whether your engine locked up, burned out, or you want to replace it with something with more power or better gas mileage, removing an engine can be hard work, so you might want to have a friend help you.

Position the Bonneville so that you can place the engine hoist in front of it. Open the hood and, using a wrench, remove the bolts from the support arms on the inside of the hood and remove the hood. Disconnect the negative cable off the battery. Raise the front end up off of the ground with the jack and rest the Bonneville on jack stands.

Pull the drain plug out of the bottom of the radiator and let the radiator drain into a bucket. Remove the hoses from the radiator with the wrench. Remove the fan and the alternator with the wrench and ratchet set. Remove the bolts securing the radiator and take out the radiator. Remove the fuel lines and the air intake with the wrench.

Loosen the power steering pump and the air-conditioning compressor with the wrench. Pull the air conditioning compressor and the power steering pump out of the way but leave the hoses connected. Remove the electric wires from the engine. Remove the bolts from the exhaust manifold and remove the exhaust manifold with the wrench. Remove the bolts that connect the engine to the transmission.

Slide underneath the Bonneville and remove the starter and exhaust pipes with the wrench and ratchet set. Remove the bolts from the transmission that connect to the engine with a wrench. Use a ratchet set to remove the bolts from the motor mounts. Remove the jack stands for underneath the Bonneville and return the front end to the ground.

Connect the chain on the hoist to both sides of the engine using the engine mounts and a bolt. Raise the engine out of the car.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Living in Tucson, Ariz., Robert Good has been writing from 2003 on a wide variety of subjects ranging from sports, gardening and cooking to auto repair, home maintenance and travel. Good holds a Bachelor of Science in psychology from the University of the State of New York.

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