How to Remove a Co-Signer From a Car Title Through the DMV

by Jennifer Williams

It makes financial sense for anyone cosigning an auto loan to require her name also be added to the title as co-owner of the vehicle. Otherwise, if the primary buyer defaults on the loan the cosigner may be stuck making payments on the vehicle to keep a repossession off of her credit report, even though she has no right to take and use the vehicle she's paying for. For the lender to release the cosigner from the loan, the loan must be paid off first.

Pay your auto loan off in full. Once the loan is paid off, the lender will send you the clean title to your car. Or, if you are refinancing because you no longer need a cosigner, the lender will issue new loan paperwork with only your name listed as the party responsible for payment.

Sign the title and ask the cosigner to sign the title. This only is necessary if the title lists your name and the cosigner's with an 'and' between the names. If the title lists your names with an 'or' between them, only one of you needs to sign the title before the DMV will reissue the title in your name alone.

Verify with your state's DMV what documentation they require to reissue the title, in addition to the signed title or new loan agreement. Additional documentation may include multiple forms of identification or proof of loan payment. You also may have to fill out a form, available at the DMV office or online, requesting your title be reissued.

Take the signed title to the DMV. Or, if you have refinanced the vehicle and have a new loan agreement, take the new loan agreement to the DMV. Take any other paperwork required for reissuing the title as well.

Present either the signed title or the new loan agreement, as well as all other required documents, and ask for a new title that lists only your name as owner. You'll be required to pay a fee and may have the choice between a paper title or an electronic title.

Items you will need

About the Author

An attorney for more than 18 years, Jennifer Williams has served the Florida Judiciary as supervising attorney for research and drafting, and as appointed special master. Williams has a Bachelor of Arts in communications from Jacksonville University, law degree from NSU's Shepard-Broad Law Center and certificates in environmental law and Native American rights from Tulsa University Law.