How to Program the 2005 Pontiac Key FOB

by Susanne Koenig

Domestic automakers usually include instructions with your owner's manual about how to program your key fob. Pontiac does include programing instructions for the Aztek, Vibe, and Montana, but not for the Bonneville, G6, Grand Am, Grand Prix, Montana SV6 or Sunfire models. These models require you to go to a Pontiac dealership or a licensed Pontiac vendor such as an automotive locksmith to program your key fob. For the Aztek, Vibe and Montana, programming is easy to do yourself.

Aztek, Vibe and Montana

Enter your 2005 Pontiac Aztek. Close all doors. Press and hold the "unlock" button on the driver's door. While holding the door lock, insert the key twice without turning it. Insert it a third time and leave the key in the ignition. Release the door lock. A chime will sound three times to let you know that you are in programming mode. Press both the "lock" and "unlock" buttons on the remote for about 30 seconds. A chime will sound twice if the remote has been programmed successfully. To exit the programming mode, simply remove the key from the ignition.

Enter your 2005 Pontiac Vibe. Lock and close all the doors except for the driver's side -- leave the driver's side open. Within five seconds, insert the key into the ignition and then pull it out. Do not turn the key. Within the next 40 seconds, close and then open the driver's door twice and insert the key again. Pull it back out. Close and open the door again, twice. Again, insert the key into the ignition and this time, leave it in. Close the driver's door. Turn the ignition to the "on" position, then back to "off." Remove the key. Within three seconds, the power door locks should lock, then unlock automatically to let you know that you are in programming mode. Start over if this does not happen. If you have heard the locks cycle automatically, then press the "lock" and "unlock" button on the remote for one and a half seconds. Then press the lock button by itself and hold for two seconds. Within three seconds, the door locks should lock and then unlock, indicating successful programming. If the door locks cycle twice, press the "lock" and "unlock" buttons again. Repeat this for each remote. Exit the car. The programming mode should discontinue automatically.

Enter your 2005 Pontiac Montana with all of your remotes. This is important because all of the remotes will erase once you enter programming mode. Put your key in the ignition and remove it. Using the legend on the fuse panel as your guide, remove the "BCM PRGRM" fuse. You can access the fuse panel by opening the front passenger door. Close all of the doors and the lift gate. Insert your key into the ignition, and turn to the "ACC" position. Turn the key to the "OFF" position and then back to "ACC" within one second. Open and close the driver's door. You will hear a chime when the car enters into its programming mode. Press and hold the fob's "lock" and "unlock" buttons at the same time for 14 seconds. After you've held it seven seconds, you will hear a chime confirming successful programming. Wait the 14 seconds for a second chime. Repeat the last step for each additional remote. Remove your key from the ignition and place the "BCM PRGRM" fuse back into its slot. Test your remotes.

Bonneville, G6, Grand Am, Grand Prix, Montana SV6 and Sunfire

Call the local Pontiac dealership. When asking about programming the key fob, get a price quote and ask if they will match prices with a locksmith.

Call a reputable automotive locksmith. Ask how much they charge per fob. Usually, an automotive locksmith will cost you much less than a dealership and charge you half price for any additional fobs.

Take your fob(s) to the vendor of your choice.

Tip

  • check Buying a key fob online can save you money, but be sure to check with the dealership or the locksmith you're using to see if they program a fob that is purchased online. Some larger metropolitan dealerships and locksmiths will only program a key fob that they sold from their own stock.

About the Author

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