How to Paint With Dupli Color Chrome

by William Zane

Chrome plating is a common finish for a number of applications, including many automotive components. Unfortunately chrome plating is also extremely expensive because of the time-consuming process to apply it, which involves applying several different layers of materials to the object being chromed. An alternative to chrome plating is using Duplicolor Chrome paint, which gives the appearance of chrome.

Strip any old paint from the object being painted with paint stripper. Apply the paint stripper and let it soak in until the old paint begins to bubble and it can be removed by scraping it with a plastic scraper or by wiping it off with a rag. Wear rubber gloves and a respirator for safety.

Sand the part with 220-grit sandpaper and then with 320-grit sandpaper. The sanding will help ensure strong adhesion when you apply the primer and the paint.

Apply a portion of the mineral spirits to a rag and then wipe down the surface. Clean the part you wish to paint with the mineral spirits until it is completely free of any sanding dust, oil and residue.

Spray on a light dusting of black Duplicolor primer to the part. Hold the can about 10 inches from the surface and use a smooth back and forth motion. Let the paint dry for a minute or so and then apply two to three solid coats of primer. Allow the primer to dry for 10 to 15 minutes between coats. When you are done, allow the primer to dry for at least an hour.

Apply a light dusting of the chrome paint to the surface. Allow the paint to dry for a few minutes. Apply several solid coats, allowing the paint to dry for an hour between coats. Hold the can 10 inches from the part and use a smooth back and forth motion. Do not let the paint build up too much in one area to avoid runs and sags.

Allow the paint to dry for several hours and then wipe off any dust from the paint that is on the surface with a clean, lint-free microfiber towel.

Tip

  • check Chrome paint is thicker and heavier then conventional paint so avoid spraying thick coats, which can cause runs and sags.

Warning

  • close Wear lung protection and rubber gloves when working with paint stripper.

Items you will need

About the Author

William Zane has been a freelance writer and photographer for over six years and specializes primarily in automotive-related subject matter among many other topics. He has attended the Academy of Art College in San Francisco, where he studied automotive design, and the University of New Mexico, where he studied journalism.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera Biker Chrome image by Joe Pitz from Fotolia.com