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N14 Cummins Torque Specifications

by Bob Shneidley

The N14 Cummins is a diesel engine manufactured by the American company Cummins. The N14 was an engine that had a lot of different uses, from powering trucks and mining equipment to motor homes and generators. The versatility of the N14 contributed to its popularity. The N14 was modeled after the design of Cummin's 855-cubic-inch engine, but the company had to make some redesigns and add some electronic controls to have it meet EPA standards.

Lifespan of the N14

The N14 debuted in 1997 as an upgraded version of Cummins' 855-cubic-inch engine. The N14 had a Celect Plus fuel system. The N14 looked similar to previous models, but more areas of the engine could be fine-tuned by the customer. In 2000, the N14 was discontinued and replaced by the Cummins ISX.

Horsepower Specs

The N14 had an estimated horsepower between 310 and 525. The actual amount of horsepower depended on the torque being applied to the engine. The peak torque was 1,250 to 1,850 ft-lb at 1200 rpm.

ECM Specifications

The ECM feature (Electronic Control Module) was added to adhere to environmental laws. The N14 also featured electronic injectors. Though these electronic injectors were cam activated, the ECM function helped to control fuel.

Maintenance Specs

The manufacturer recommends changing the oil filter every 12,000 miles. Also to be changed at the 12,000-mile mark are the fuel filter and the coolant filter. The valve adjustment should be serviced every 120,000 miles, 3,000 hours or two years, whichever comes the soonest.

Part Numbers

The part number for the oil filter is LF3000. The part number for the fuel filter is FS1000. The part number for the coolant filter is WF2071.

General Specifications

For the N14 engine, the intake valve clearance is .014 inch. The exhaust valve clearance is .027 inch and the engine brake clearance is .023 inch. The firing order of the N14 is 1-5-2-6-2-4. The oil pressure is 10 psi when the engine is idling and 25 psi when the engine is wound up to 1,200 rpm. The fuel pressure is 25 psi when the engine is idling and goes up to 120 psi when the engine is at 1,200 rpm.

About the Author

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