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How to Install Shocks on a 1996 Chevy Silverado

by Melanie Fleury

Shocks on a 1996 Chevy Silverado are part of the truck's system that absorbs the shaking from the car as it drives along. This not only helps with the comfort of the passengers, it also helps to protect other components of the car that should not bounce around. If your Silverado is making passengers and cargo jump around, then it is time to change your shocks.

Front Shocks

Lift the Silverado with the floor jack and support it with jack stands. The car should be turned off but the emergency brake should be on. Park the vehicle on a level surface to prevent it from rolling backward. Disconnect the electrical wire running from the wheel well by twisting counterclockwise. Pull up the metal tenon that is attached and remove it by detaching the nut that holds it into the wheel well.

Find the shock absorber. The shock absorber is a metal tube inside another metal tube. The outer tube is connected to the arm that is holding the wheel. Slide the outside tube over so that the absorber, or inside tube, is visible. Remove the mounting bolts on the lower arm with a ratchet. The shock absorber can then be pulled off.

Line up the new shock absorber up to the mounting holes and connect it with the bolts. Set your torque wrench to 59 foot pounds. Bolt the absorber and then use the torque wrench to tighten.

Connect the tenon to the connector and loosely put on the nut; do not tighten it. Twist the locking tabs together until you hear a click or snapping noise.

Lower the car from the jack stand. Tighten the tenon with the torque wrench to 15 foot pounds.

Rear Shocks

Lift the Silverado off the ground with the floor jack and make sure it is supported and stable with the jack stands.

Unscrew the nut and bolt holding the upper and lower shock absorbers using the ratchet. Remove the shocks.

Line up the new shocks and secure with nut and bolts for both upper and lower shocks. Use the torque wrench to tighten to 70 foot pounds.

Lower the Silverado off the jack stands.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Melanie Fleury has been writing professionally since 1995. She has written for various educational websites such as Edhelper.com and is the educational consultant at the Knowledge Tree Center for Education. She enjoys creating curriculum for children with various learning styles. Fleury holds a master's degree in education specializing in early childhood from Ashwood University.

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