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How to Charge the A/C in the 2005 Jeep Liberty

by Richard Ristow; Updated November 07, 2017

Items you will need

  • Thermometer

  • Protective eye coverings

  • R134a recharging kit

Recharging a 2005 Jeep Liberty's R134a freon levels is an easy job. It is one of the simplest automotive air conditioning maintenance task. All you need is an air conditioning recharging kit, and they are widely available anywhere automotive products are sold. When buying a kit, be sure you do not purchase one with an R12 freon cannister. R12 is not eco-friendly, and it is not compatible with a 2005 Jeep Liberty. Always, when buying a R134a recharging kit, read and defer to the manufacturer's instructions. While the process is similar, there are slight variations by brand.

Soak a clean towel in very warm water. You may need it later. Also, put on protective eyewear. While adding R134a to a Jeep's A/C system is a relatively simple task, you are still dealing with a compressed gas.

Open the recharging kit's packaging and assemble the kit. The hose, gauge and valve assembly will need to be screwed into the top of the R134a's canister. Do not turn the valve all the way to the base, however. That will release the R134a too early.

Open the 2005 Jeep Liberty's hood and locate the A/C system. You are looking for aluminum tubing with a high- and low-side port. Remove the cover from the low-side port and place the cover in a safe spot for later. Fit the recharging hose snugly and securely onto the low-side port.

Locate a safe place inside the engine compartment to set the recharging kit. Step 5 requires starting the Jeep Liberty's engine, so the kit needs to go somewhere away from parts and components that will move. Set the kit down.

Climb behind the 2005 Jeep Liberty's steering wheel. Place the key into the ignition and crank the engine. Switch on the A/C system to maximum coldness and blowing capacity. Place a thermometer into an A/C vent and watch the temperature drop. Once the A/C has reached its coldest possible temperature, look at the temperature gauge on the dash. The vehicle needs to be at its normal running temperature.

Return to the recharging kit, and take the thermometer with you. Leave the doors open so that the A/C system will not accidentally cycle "off."

Pick up the recharging kit you left in the engine compartment. Turn the valve at the top of the R134a canister all the way down. The R134a freon will rush out of the canister and into Jeep's A/C system. If the can gets too cold to hold, you can wrap it in a wet, warm towel.

Turn the valve atop the canister upwards and stop the flow of freon. This will let you monitor the gauges on the recharging kit. Allow a minute, at least, for the new gas charge to work into the A/C system.

Place a thermometer into one of the A/C's ducts and monitor the temperature inside the system. Once the output temperature has dropped to 40 degrees, the system has reached its normal operational coldness. Also, toward the end of the process, all the aluminum tubing will be cold.

Close the valve atop the R134a canister once the recharging is complete or when the can has become depleted. Never over-charge or overfill an A/C system. It is always best to err on the side of not topping off the system completely. Remove the recharging hose from the low side port and replace the covering. Close the hood and shut the 2005 Jeep Liberty's engine and A/C system off.

Leave the hose, gauge, and valve atop the R134a canister if there is any refrigerant left. Do not discharge the excess freon. Store the can in a dark place away from fluctuations in temperature and in an upright position.

About the Author

Richard Ristow has written for journals, newspapers and websites since 2002. His work has appeared in "2009 Nebula Showcase" and elsewhere. He is a winner of the Science Fiction Poetry Association's Rhysling Award and he edits poetry for Belfire Press. He also holds a Master of Fine Arts from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and has managed an automotive department at WalMart.

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